The Water Walk June 10, 2019

Every morning, 12-year-old Diana gets up with the sun. Before she can go to school, she has to get water for her family.

Diana lives in Salgaa, a densely populated town in Kenya. It’s a truck stop for long-distance drivers, but most of the residents – like Diana’s family – are farmers. Her dad drives a tractor, but most of his pay goes to cover rent on their small house. There is very little left for food, clothes, or school fees for Diana and her siblings.

Worst of all, there’s no money left for water.

Which is why Diana gets up early every morning (more…)

Celebrating the Choir June 3, 2019

The Ugandan Kids Choir delighted audiences around the United States for over a decade, with upbeat performances featuring authentic East African music, drumming, and dance, along with Christian Ugandan and American worship songs. Everywhere they went they put a smile on people’s faces, and a bounce in people’s step. As we look back on 13 years of tours, we wanted to share a few of our favorite memories of tours past.

1. So many firsts!

Tour life is filled with new experiences. Swimming is always a favorite with choir kids, but that wasn’t the only thing they got to experience here in the United States. They saw snow for the first time, tried their hand at baseball, took their first plane rides, tasted new foods, and so much more!

(more…)

5 Reasons Why Water Matters May 28, 2019

If you can, try to count how many times a day you turn on a tap. As I write this, it’s not even 9am, and I’m already up to seven. I’ve taken a shower, flushed a toilet, washed my hands, made coffee, rinsed my cereal bowl, and gotten a glass of water. Clean, running water is so readily available to us, it’s almost impossible to understand what life is like without clean water access.

But in developing countries, many people still don’t have access to clean water, even today. And it’s more than just an inconvenience: every 90 seconds, a child dies from diseases spread by dirty water. That’s why water is one of our best opportunities to improve children’s lives. Here’s how:

1. Clean water is health.

Without running water, families turn to whatever water sources they can find. (more…)

Sponsorship: Fast Track to a Bright Future May 20, 2019

Livingstone’s story is anything but ordinary. He’s endured a lot of heartbreak, but he didn’t let that keep him down for long.

When he was just 9 years old, Livingstone’s parents both got sick and passed away. (more…)

FIELD NOTES FROM PERU May 14, 2019

I recently made a visit to our Childcare Worldwide office in Peru. What an amazing trip! I was blessed by the kids we serve in Lima. It was yet another great reminder of the wonderful work I get to do as president of this ministry.

MUSTARD SEED PROJECTS

Our work in Peru is unique in that we provide child sponsorship programs as well as socioeconomic opportunities for women. I was able to meet several ladies who benefit from a CCW provided sewing machine.

Childcare Worldwide Peru provides classes where women are taught how to sew clothes. The clothes they make can be sold at a profit which helps provide these women an economic benefit. The income from these micro businesses contribute toward (more…)

Change May 2, 2019

Ecclesiastes 3:1 – For everything there is a season, and a time for every matter under heaven.

There is one thing we humans can always count on; it’s change. Everything changes. Sometimes change comes on quick, while other times change is painfully slow. Expectations change. There is good change and there is bad change. It’s always there. Change forever weaves throughout our lives.

This month we experienced a change here at Childcare Worldwide. After more than a decade of performing for tens of thousands of people, the Ugandan Kids Choir has concluded its final tour.

In 2006, we brought the first group of choir kids to the United States. They performed at Childcare Worldwide’s 25th anniversary (more…)

The Miracle of Sponsorship April 30, 2019

Chamali’s story is a miracle. It’s also an amazing testament to the strength of her amazing mother, and the difference that a caring sponsor like you, can make in a child’s life.

Chamali lives in Sri Lanka with her mom Indu and her younger sister Bhagiya.

Her mother was married off at just 16 years old. After the hurried wedding, Indu found out that her new husband made illegal moonshine, and that her own father had sold her (more…)

Irene’s Life After Tour April 15, 2019

After 8 months of traveling around the United States with the Ugandan Kids Choir, 13-year-old Irene is back home in Uganda. We caught up with her at her school a few weeks after she got home, to see how she’s adjusting to her old life.

Irene was so happy to be back home. Her favorite part was seeing her family, especially her mom, (more…)

Hungry, embarrassed, exhausted, late April 10, 2019

Nerious is a lot like most 12-year-old girls you’ve met. She is full of life. She’s trying to figure out who she is, and what her place in the world is. She can be really shy, and easily embarrassed. Nerious loves a good story – her favorite subject is English. And she wants to be a doctor when she grows up.

But Nerious lives in Kenya and her family is poor.

That means her life is so much harder than most 12-year-olds’. You see, Nerious’ dad died (more…)

Relying on the Land March 29, 2019

This April, the Childcare Worldwide family is embarking on a prayer journey. For 30 days, we’ll be praying for God’s blessing and provision for the hungry children and families we serve around the world. To start us off, Charles, our Director in Uganda is here to share about his own experience with hunger and what it looks like for families today. For more content like this, and to add your voice to 30 Days of Prayer, sign up here.


 

42 years ago, I was born and raised in Buganda, Uganda, a region which was known predominantly as an agricultural region: a food basket and economic power house for Uganda. We would enjoy at least three meals a day, a heavy breakfast at 10am after gardening, lunch at 2pm and dinner at 8pm. Food was always in surplus to accommodate even visitors.

During our primary school times, our mothers would preserve some of the food which we would carry to school for our breakfast and lunch. This was typical of every household because homes produced more than enough food. Almost every household had fruits like mangoes, jackfruits, lemons, passion fruits, (more…)